Posts Tagged Sunburn

Watch for the Sunburn – Prevention and Relief

Posted on June 21, 2012 with No Comments

It seems every year at this time we put together something about sunburn and sunburn relief.  Well…the late spring and early summer is when we seem to get hit hardest (and exposed the most), so it stands to reason the topic comes up.  Also, considering we manufacture 200+ products, we have a few things on our plate(s), but the first week of summer we are overwhelmed with customer calls complaining about sunburn.  It quickly comes to mind and becomes a “hot topic” when your daughter comes home with burned, blistered shoulders and nose as mine did last week.

I guess the general comment is prevention with a secondary comment on relief.

At the beginning of the year, the sun is not as high in the sky so many of the UVB/UVA is filtered by the atmosphere.  As the summer solstice approaches (and is in fact here), the sun is higher and radiation is more direct.  Meaning, burning happens very fast especially for those fair-skined like myself.  I was working in the garden this weekend then hung-out by the pool for an hour or so with the kids and sure enough my shoulders, back of the neck and stomach were a bit burned.

With that said, prevention comes in the form of keeping covered with light clothing, staying hydrated and using a sunscreen.  Since I don’t like using lotions, I’m particularly fond of the sprays that came out a few years ago.  At first, they were effective but had poor dispersion.  In the past year or so, they work great…especially when applying outdoors.  The point is – you can and will become burned quickly in as little as 15 minutes for most folks especially if you have not established a tan.

Second, once a burn has occurred, treatment is necessary to avoid blisters, pain and to provide general relief.  We manufacturer a sunburn relief product, Regeneval Dermal EM Sunburn Relief…we refer to it only as “sunburn relief”  It’s a combination of menthol that soothes and cools the tissue and emu oil that is used extensively for treating burns and cuts to heal the skin.  My daughter tried it on her shoulders and they felt better immediately, but more importantly helped heal the burn quickly over the next few days.

Another option which has made some headlines recently is the use of black tea.  While I don’t understand the chemistry, it has shown to rapidly diminish the effects of the sunburn.  Apparently you take black tea, soak in water and apply to the skin and affected area.

Bottom line is prevention is the best cure, but there are some effective relief products available.

What Causes Age Spots?

Posted on February 14, 2012 with No Comments

What causes age spots? The cause of spotting, discoloration and dark spots can be explained by the assaults on skin from the natural elements, like the cumulative effect of sun exposure. The sun causes the increase in melanocytes in the skin, therefore darkening the skin tone. In general, this darkening is temporary and when removed from sun exposure, these melanocytes disappear and the suntan begins to fade. As people age, repair systems in the body do not perform at their optimum any longer. Some brown spots are left behind on sun exposed areas. The sun is not alone in getting the blame for age spots. The same damage you get from the sun, you can also get from tanning beds or tanning lamps.

Age Spots on Hands

Age Spots on Hands

Why Do People Get Age Spots?

This focuses more on the aging process itself. The older the body gets, the more work it had to do over the lifetime of the person to keep him healthy. This means that when potentially harmful material enters the body, lysosomes ingest the offending substances. This phagocytosis produces left-over “garbage” of brown pigmented, lipid-laden granules called lipofuscin. In itself, lipofuscin does no harm. It is only evidence of increased free radical formation in the body and decreased enzymatic action to neutralize the free radicals.  With less neutralization of free radicals, there is less repair of sun damage and the affected skin has parts where melanocytes are permanently anchored.

Who Gets Age Spots?

Generally people over the age of forty are the ones to get these age spots, or liver spots as they used to be called. This was a misnomer, since the spots have no connection at all to the liver. The proper name for this condition is solar lentigo.  Solar lentigines are mostly found on those body parts that are exposed to the sun’s ultraviolet rays. This makes sense, since the exposed areas are where the melanocytes are and where repair is necessary.

Are Age Spots Harmful?

The age spots themselves are not harmful at all. They are just a side effect of aging and can be treated with bleaching or whitening skin care products, with procedures and treatments or can be left alone and accepted.  Actually, the agent of what causes age spots, the sun, is the harmful influence. The only problem in the presence of age spots is a cosmetic one. Ladies especially, like to have unblemished, even skin tones. Solar lentigines give a spotted look no one wants. These spots can be on the face, arms and hands. Sometimes they are present on legs as well. The back of the hands, arms and the face is where the most efforts to have them removed are concentrated.

Is There A Treatment For Age Spots?

Age Spots on the Face

Age Spots on the Face

In order to lighten age spots to make them faint enough to be hardly noticeable, age spot creams to bleach the affected area are available with a prescription. This is a time consuming process. It takes months to get the desired results. While under this treatment, skin must be protected with sun block since bleaching creams make the skin even more vulnerable to UV rays. Dermabrasions and chemical peels focus on removing the upper layer of the epidermis. This process includes removing the entire layer of skin along with the pigmented portions. It is a procedure that leaves the skin red and tender until a new skin layer grows. More expensive treatment possibilities are laser treatment and cryotherapy.

Time for Spring Skin Care

Posted on March 30, 2010 with No Comments

With temperatures warming and Spring in the air, its time to consider what you need to do for adequate skin care. A couple of the areas we need to consider are preventing and treating sunburn as well as keeping your face moisturized.

Spring Skin Care

Many dermatologist consider damage by constant or chronic exposure to the sun as one of the most damaging environmental factors on tissue. UVA and UVB rays can burn skin and accelerate free-radical damage from oxidization which is considered a primary cause of pre-mature skin aging.

When out in the sun, you should:

  • Wear light, protective clothing…don’t forget your neck!
  • Use an SPF 25 or better sunscreen. Make sure you cover arms, face, legs and hands as well.
  • Be prepared to treat sunburn with an effective sunburn relief product
  • Keep skin moisturized
  • Drink lots of fluids (preferably non-alcoholic)

While prevention is always the best cure for sunburn, its important to treat sunburn effectively for the skin to recover. Using products that have emu oil can help replenish lost hydration as well as help prevent inflammation and infection. Menthol or peppermint can help soothe itching and burning and provide a cooling relief to the burning. Our recommended product is Dermal EM® Sunburn Relief from RegenVal Labs.

On the flip side, keeping your skin moisturized is important. Wind, heat, salt and dry air can dry tissue making it tight itchy and flaky. The best way to replenish hydration is with lotions that contain hyaluronic acid. It instantly hydrates and moisturizes; and used with firming and anti-aging agents, helps your skin stay smooth soft and young looking. Our recommended product is Skin Tight® lotion from Nourish products.

Treating Sunburn with Emu Oil

Posted on May 31, 2009 with No Comments

A few posts back I mentioned Dermal Em sunburn treatment. Having grown-up in Florida and spending lot’s of time on the South Carolina coast has given me more exposure to the sun than I would like to count. Plus, as I ‘m getting into my 50′s I’m starting to see the results on my skin – a few spots on my arms and reappearing spider veins on my nose and cheeks.

My family returned Friday from a week at Edisto Beach. Everyone was tan except for my fair-skinned 14-year-old whose nose was burned, peeling and blistered. All of us have seen the signs of too much sun. His blistering had turned to scabs (yuk!) and I was afraid he would continue to pick and get some scarring.

We promptly sat him down and used some emu oil I had in the bathroom. Voila – 3 days have past and his nose is looking great…still burned and a bit scabbed, but you can tell the healing has begun and a lot of repair is in progress.

I have written a lot about emu oil. Yes, it is generally unknown as a remedy, but it has been in use for many years “down below” in Australia – where the bird is indigenous. It is a great product for treating burns, scars, stretchmarks, and lacerations from injury or surgery. Some folks are unfamiliar with it, but it has become widely used in many skin care and hair care products for its’ ability to penetrate deep into tissue promoting healing and collagen growth.

You might ask why I didn’t use Dermal Em, well because I didn’t have any. There is some at the plant, but it’s a two-hour drive and we wanted to get my son’s nose healing as soon as possible – hopefully avoiding any infection or further complications. Besides Dermal Em is emu oil with Vitamin E added and blended with menthol that helps cool the skin providing more immediate relief from sun burn.

Anyway, since this just happened Friday, I thought I would pass on some un-scientific, real-world results from just a couple of days application. With school out and many folks either heading to the pool, beach or at least more outside activities, it is good to know there is a very effective remedy for treating sunburn.

Remedies for a Bad Sunburn

Posted on May 25, 2009 with No Comments

I just got back from 3 days at the beach, and as usual and am looking for remedies for a bad sunburn on my nose.

Finding relief for the burning and peeling go back to when I was a kid growing up in Orlando. My Dad, who was a Remedies for a Bad Sunburndentist, always had an Aloe plant in the backyard and sent us scrambling to peel open the leaves and wipe the gooey insides on our face.

It felt soothing and seemed to make everything OK until it started to dry – making our skin tight and dried-out. Aloe and lidocaine have since become popular ingredients helping soothe and cool sunburns all over the planet in OTC products. And, while the healing effects have become widely known, we have found there are options to heal and treat you can consider, especially of the burn is severe (which mine is borderline!)

I have written several times about emu oil. It is a very popular remedy in Australia and somewhat in New Zealand. It is one of the few oils used in skin care products that is considered a “carrier” oil – meaning it is capable and has properties to penetrate to the subcutaneous layer of the skin. While this may not seem too important, many creams and lotions do not have a carrier oil – primarily because of expense (it’s not cheap). The benefits, as they say, out way the costs. The ability to penetrate deep greatly improves it’s – and other ingredients its formulated with – efficacy or effectiveness. Especially when considering sun burn remedies, getting to the lower layers of tissue is paramount.

With that said, emu oil, does several other things. First it is widely used to treat burns in general. It is a natural anti-bacterial, helping wounds to remain sterilized and fighting off infection, a primary concern to fight infection. It is a natural moisturizer, antiseptic and promotes healthy skin cell and collagen renewal. This helps prevent scars and improves elasticity and pliability of tissue.

If combined with vitamin e and menthol, as with my favorite remedy for bad sunburn, Dermal Em, you you get the soothing and cooling relief with the benefit of the healing power and regenerative qualities needed to avoid tightening, itchy or excessive peeling.

While there is plenty of discussion as to the difference between “bad” and “severe”, the fundamental premise of treatment is the same:

  • Drink plenty of fluid to avoid dehydration and to maintain body fluids
  • Provide no open wounds, keep the affected area moisturized, clean and sterilized, if possible
  • To relieve pain, itchy and soreness, products based with with emu oil, lidocaine or menthol (peppermint, spearmint) can help with the “heat”.

The best remedies for a bad sunburn I have found combine emu oil, vitamin e and menthol. The skin gets some relief with a light cooling sensation to burned tissue (I like the smell also), and the vitamin e and emu oil do a great job helping heal the burn.